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Dolphins, heritage and perfect coastline: Exploring New Zealand by Kayak
Brent Narbey
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Brent Narbey

Untouched waterways, pristine lakes and perfect coastline make up a fair bit of New Zealand’s environment. Many of these places are isolated and hard-to-reach, but those that seek to explore this kind of wilderness are rewarded with one-of-a-kind experiences that are well off the beaten track. From our experience, one of the best ways to seek these remote and special places is by Exploring New Zealand by Kayak.  Imagine kayaking with dolphins under sunny skies in Northland’s Bay of Islands or paddling through a marine reserve in Abel Tasman National Park.

Brent Narbey
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Brent Narbey

Rafting in New Zealand – the ultimate kiwi adventure!
Brent Narbey
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Brent Narbey

One of the best ways to truly explore New Zealand’s most isolated and beautiful environments is with a rafting adventure. Pristine waterways – often complete with high-energy rapids and canyons – wind through temperate rainforests, past sky scraping mountain peaks and alongside valleys dotted with wildflowers. At First Light Travel, we love down-to-earth adventures in the New Zealand wilderness, and rafting in New Zealand through isolated backcountry is about as good as it can get...  

Brent Narbey
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Brent Narbey

New Zealand Wildlife - Part 1:Birds
Steve Taylor
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Steve Taylor

When humans first arrived in New Zealand, no more than 900 years ago, birdsong and surf would have been the first noise they heard as they approached the lush forested islands - the land was almost exclusively populated by birds that make up the bulk of New Zealand wildlife. New Zealand's 80 million years of isolation, since breaking away from the super-continent of Gondwanaland, has allowed the evolution of nearly 200 species of birds and due to the absence of mammalian predators a high proportion of them were flightless – some of them grew into Giants - but what birds they are!

Steve Taylor
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Steve Taylor